The New Interior Trends for 2021

 

Usually at the beginning of a new year magazine editors, journalists, interior designers, stylists, brands and influencers are all looking at what the new trends are that are needed to be interpreted, written about, photographed or posted on social media.

Image Dulux

These trends are forecast 2 years in advance and then gradually trickled down to the High Street and into our homes. But 2 years ago not one of us could have predicted what sort of insular world we would now be living in and how catastrophically our lives would have changed.

Suddenly trends seem to be as outdated as the Dodo. All any of us want is familiarity, comfort, security and nostalgia for the world we left behind pre March 2020 and so it’s inevitable that the biggest trends of 2021, apart from the home office, no surprise there, are heritage, classic design, vintage, antiques, shabby chic, versions of cottage core, one slightly more luxe if rocking chairs and liberty fabrics aren’t quite your bag. Any others that might have previously been predicted have pivoted.

So in a quick round up of what we can expect homes on Pinterest and Instagram to look like for 2021, here is my edit and take on the “trends” that the media are talking about and if your home already looks like a version of this, then you are bang on trend as the biggest trend of all is sustainability, buying well and buying the best of it’s kind and then, close your ears influencers, keeping it for more than 6 months! No serial decorating, throwing out your furniture with the bath water, retiling the whole of the kitchen or bathroom every time a new design has a moment. Yes the only trend worth following this year, is having a home that is your sanctuary and your refuge from this crazy world we are all part of.

Vintage

Reclaimed, repurposed, vintage, antiques, all are having a huge influence on interiors as we look to create familiar surroundings, with a mindfulness and consciousness to the environment. The heritage nature of this look, which includes using lots of wooden pieces, provides a feeling of nostalgia and familiarity which is something we’re all craving.

image Berdoulat_interior_design

Classic Traditionalism

Symmetry, timeless design, art on walls, beautiful textiles and a return to patterned textiles on curtains, walls and flooring, although not necessarily all together, create a sense of harmony & comfort. This style is perfectly demonstrated  by the type of interiors created by the design team at Soho House hotels and who better to learn from? If you’re looking for inspiration for this look, I’d recommend their book “Morning, Noon, Night” which I received as a gift for Christmas. It’s full of beautiful comfortable room ideas.

image Soho House Barcelona
Image Ben Pentreath

Shabby Chic

I can’t quite believe I’m typing this word. This is the trend that just keeps giving and this year it’s back strong, with a real return to hand painted and distressed furniture, made popular by Annie Sloan and Rachel Ashwell. If you can’t find original chippy painted pieces from Europe, and it’s not easy during a pandemic with all the antique fairs and shops closed, although there’s still lots of great antique furniture dealers online, that can organise a courier, why not have a go yourself with some chalk paint, clear wax and lots of elbow grease? The home of Pearl Lowe and her book Faded Glamour is also great for looking for inspiration for this romantic look.

The home of designer Pearl Lowe is full of shabby chic items. Image House & Garden

Eco & sustainability

As I’ve said before, this isn’t really a trend, it’s fast becoming a lifestyle choice for many which is really the same category where all these other trends fall under. This focuses on using small batch goods and hand made items though rather than recycling and has a definite connection with the hand crafted. Introduce textiles that have been hand blocked such as the designs made by Molly Mahon. Use materials such as linen, organic cotton and wool in warm tones such as ochre, moss green and stone. This is a look that relies on investing in pieces with longevity, durability and quality. Our desire for mass produced, cheap throwaway products with a huge carbon footprint, that change as quickly as the weather, is coming to an end and if the figures seen recently on global warming are to be taken seriously, they need to!

image of Molly Mahons home from Sophie Robinson blog

Distant shores

As our last poolside or coastal holiday becomes a faded memory with no firm plans for travel in the foreseeable future, it’s no surprise that we crave the colours of the exotic and the ocean. Using patterns featuring tropical flowers, leaves and fruit against a backdrop of bright colours, on wallpapers and fabrics helps to bring the outdoors in. For a more subdued version of this look use tropical flowers and patterned fabrics against a more muted background of dark inky colours.

image Homes & Gardens

Rustic Vogue

This is a more sophisticated look on last years Cottage core which you can read more about in my blog post here. Whilst cottage core was perfect for a period property with oodles of original features, this look is all about creating it yourself. If you haven’t got original period features in your home, try adding them with faux panelling, reclaimed flooring or natural fibre flooring such as sisal or seagrass and patterned textiles in a natural colour palette, layered up.

Image Homes & Gardens

cosy corners and nooks

whilst many of us have had to create some form of home office for working, the other key trend that’s emerged from lockdown is the need for a space of ones own, a place to escape the rest of the clan that we’ve been forced to spend more time with than usual. The result of this dilemma is the emergence of the reading corner or the cosy nook created in a part of the house where we can escape to knit, listen to a podcast or scroll on our phones in peace. All that’s needed is a quiet corner, an armchair, side table for drink, book etc and some cushions and a throw for those colder days of winter, bookcase optional but a bonus 🙂

Image source Pinterest



I love this clever use of space by @osborninteriors which would make the perfect cosy nook for curling up with a favourite book.


Bookcase envy @realrobbentley
My own reading corner next to the natural light and bookcase.

 

 

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