The Modern Bohemians and Creating an Aesthetic Movement Style Interior

The aesthetic movement was a reaction against the mass production of the industrial revolution at the turn of the last century and it’s no coincidence that many of the design ideas that were made popular then, by artists and designers such as William Morris and Dante Rossetti, have re-emerged as trends over the last few years in our own homes.

The look was embraced by the middle classes of the time, who filled their homes with art work, hand made textiles, exotic woven rugs and hand carved and embellished furniture, influenced by the onset of overseas travel by the upper classes. Many of these designs, imported from countries such as Japan and India, could be bought from high class stores such as Liberty in London and this style was quickly embraced by creative thinkers and bohemians.

The arts & crafts building of Liberty London
The interior of the wonderful grade II listed Malplaquet House in London’s East End restored & decorated in an Aesthetic style

William Morris is famously remembered for his quote

“Have noting in your house(s) that you do not know to be useful or believe to be beautiful”

William Morris original wallpaper Designs have enjoyed a revival in modern homes recently.

It’s no surprise that this look has become embraced again in our homes by modern Bohemians such as TV presenter Laura Jackson. There is a definite reaction again to the consumerism of the past decade where homewares have been mass produced in the 100s of thousands in factories far across the globe. There’s a real appreciation again of hand crafted and hand made, small batch good, mixed together with salvaged antiques and vintage treasures which Laura’s house beautifully demonstrates.

 

The home of Laura Jackson

Melbourne Interior designer Tigger Hall’s eclectic home is another beautiful example of this style.
Exotic details and heavy use of pattern and textiles in Tigger Hall’s home

I’ve put together a mood board below on how to get this look with a mixture of vintage and, where possible, ethical and consciously made pieces. I hope Mr Morris would be happy.

 

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